PYROGRAPHY (WOODBURNING) GALLERY #3

by BRIAN GRAHAM






# 45. This elk in a snowstorm done on a basswood plank with bark on is also from North American Game animals. It is coloured with oil pencils from Walnut Hollow. The colour is blended by using low odour paint thinner with a blending stick available from an art store. These are wrapped paper which come to a sharp point and are excellent for this job. Q-tips (Zellers brand - as they are not so puffy can also be used especially on large areas). The coloured background is done with blues and purples. The white snowflakes are added after the other colours have been blended. This work won Third place in the 2001 ottawa Wood Show in the Coloured Pyrography Competition.

















# 56. This Red Fox was done from a 2002 calendar put out by the Ontario Wildlife foundation. It was done on a poplar plank with the bark left on. The colouring really helped convey this magnificient animal. The orange colours were wonderful to work with. I also liked letting your imagination take over for the portrayal of the body. This work won Third place in the Quinte 2002 Carving Competition in the Advanced Pyrography Competition.

















# 40. This riding horse is from a photo and woodburning by Lynda Eaves. I was particularly taken with the nostrils and the whispy effect. The woodburning is done on poplar which is softer than basswood and therefore burns a little darker and faster. The mottled effect on the throat was done with the shader tip. This work won Third place in the Outaouais Wood Carver's Progressive Competition in 2001.























# 50. This pyrography of a leopard was taken from the cover of the October 2001 issue of the National Geographic. This magazine is a wonderful source of wildlife material. This was fun to do - lots of colour and lots of woodburning - all the dark spots are only burned - no colour added. Actually with oil pencils - NEVER USE THE BLACK! You will find that this colour does not behave like the others and usually tends to ruin the pyrography if used. the Green background adds the forest effect for the presentation of this animal. The eyes on the leopard and many of my burningsare highlighted by adding a drop or two of 'Treasure Crystal Cote' - a thick high gloss finishing coating which brings out the eyes.

















#51. This grey wolf was done on box elder. This wood is rather hard to burn but is spectacular for doing wild animals on. It was lightly coloured to let the wood grain show through to give the pyrography a natural look.

















#31. This Owl from Cheryl Dow's Book 3 is done on basswood and is woodburned only. No colouir has been added. It is finished with 3 coats of Deft acrylic spray.

















#67. This oil pencil coloured woodburning of tulips on a basswood round was done for a "Wood Wizard" table at our club, The Outaouais Wood Carvers of Ottawa,Ontario, Canada. Everyone submits a carving or pyrography on a certain topic. Since it was the "Tulip Festival" in Ottawa we participated in this theme. The Tulip Festival is a 2 week event in Ottawa where spring,tulips and people come together in celebration - it is a great event. Come if you have a chance!

















#68 This fawn was done as a primer for a larger commissioned work. This young whitetailed deer because of its delicate nature should be done with a light touch - lighter woodburning and colouring.

















#72 This pyrography of a wonderful picture of nuzzling wolves was woodburned on a poplar plank 13" x 11"; coloured with oil pencils blended in with solvent; and finished with 3 coats of Krylon acrylic latex gloss finish #47110.







#75 This pine mailbox with a male and female cardinal on the front and sides was done to replace the metal mailbox we had at our house. The mailbox was given to me by my wife as a birthday present to woodburn. I used the solid single temperature burner with the universal tip. Pine is one wood that doesn't burn well with the sharper tips found in the variable heat burners. This is because the wood is so soft. The birds and the berries were coloured with oil pencils. The box was finished with 2 coats of Krylon Int/Ext clear acrylic. then one coat of Krylon UV protectorwas applied.





#73 This pyrography of a Christmas scene of a sleigh filled with presents and a tree was from a card by Alina Pino, a member of the Mouth and Foot painting artists. It was done on a 4" x 6" x 1/8 " thick piece of basswood from Michaels (comes in 24" length - makes 4 'cards'). It was coloured with oil pencils blended in with solvent; and finished with 3 coats of Krylon acrylic latex gloss finish #47110. It was mounted in a "SHIM" wood frame (about $9) with the glass removed. You should not put your work in contact with glass. if you want the glass in the picture frame, put a mat around the edge to keep the pyrography off the glass.













#74 This pyrography of Christmas bells was from an internet site with Christmas patterns. It was done on a 4" x 6" x 1/8 " thick piece of basswood from Michaels (comes in 24" length - makes 4 'cards'). It was coloured with oil pencils blended in with solvent; and finished with 3 coats of Krylon acrylic latex gloss finish #47110. It was mounted in a wood frame from K-Mart (about $4) with the glass removed.















# 82. This Wood Duck is from Walnut Hollow's Book 4 on Creative woodburning. It is done on a round of Willow 15" x 10" It has only been woodburned - no colour added. It was coated with Krylon UV acrylic spray and one coat of Krylon Latex gloss spray. The reflection into the water of the reeds and duck really make this pyrography.











# 79. A beautiful Saw-whet owl in a forest. Concept from Ontario wildlife Foundation 2002 Calendar - many wonderful pictures. The picture was taken by Bill Keay. Owl's feet/toes were adapted from Glen Loates book of Birds of North America - another wonderful source of birds. It was coated with 3 coatsof Krylon Latex gloss spray.























# 84. This action shot of two deer jumping over a log is very well designed. It should be because it was done by Glen loates, one of the premiere wildlife artists in Canada. It was very interesting to work on all the elements plus colouring the animals and the snow. It was coloured with oil-pencils and blended with odorless thinner. It was coated with three coats of Krylon Latex matte spray.


















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Last Updated September 15, 2012 by Brian Graham